Although marijuana may have some benefits, its use could cause health issues for older people with cardiovascular disease. One case, in particular, is sparking some questions.

Marijuana in edible form may have cardiovascular risks for people at risk.

In recent years, the legalization of marijuana has become more widespread.

Some people use the drug recreationally, while some use it to relieve chronic pain and the impact of some mental health issues.

However, experts state that there needs to be more research into the effects of marijuana in older people.

Specifically, the scientific community needs to focus on educating the public on aspects such as potential effects and recommended dosages.

A Canadian Journal of Cardiology case report goes some way toward that. It examined a 70-year-old man who had a heart attack after eating a lollipop that was infused with 90 milligrams (mg) of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) — which is largely responsible for marijuana’s psychological effects.

The man lived with stable coronary artery disease, and he was taking cardiac medication. He ate most of the lollipop and did so to help minimize pain and improve sleep.

Dr. Alexandra Saunders — who works in Horizon Health Network’s Department of Cardiology in New Brunswick, Canada — described the man’s 90-mg dose as “inappropriate.”

Smoking a typical joint would expose a person to just 7 mg of THC, while a starting dose of a synthetic THC called dronabinol is only 2.5 mg. People with AIDS or cancer tend to use this version, and it can also combat nausea and encourage appetite.

Marijuana can be a useful tool for many patients, especially for pain and nausea relief. At the same time, like all other medications, it does carry risk and side effects.”

Dr. Alexandra Saunders

A cardiovascular link

The large amount of THC the man consumed caused him to experience anxiety and hallucinations. The strain that these effects put on his body is what likely caused his heart attack, by triggering a response in the sympathetic nervous sytem.

His cardiac event was demonstrated by a rapid heart rate, an abnormally high blood pressure, and the release of the stress hormone catecholamine. The man’s chest pain went away as soon as the effects of the marijuana had worn off.